My Story of Hope

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Five days before Pilgrim Center of Hope celebrates its 25th year of guiding people to Christ and His Church, I would like to share my Pilgrim Center of Hope Story.

It actually began in Mandeville, Louisiana, in the year 2010. My family was making a move back to San Antonio, Texas, and once my sons were settled back into school, I needed a part-time job. One day, I walked into the small Adoration Chapel at a local parish and, in front of Our Lord and Lady, I boldly presented a list of what I wanted. At the time, I was blessed to be a stay-at-home mom, and I loved it. Through an encounter with Jesus, I was brought back into the Catholic faith that I had left 20 years before. I discovered the richness of the faith and God’s great love for women in the Church. I was involved with parish groups, and simply hungered for God. I was not at all happy to have to possibly stop what I love for a job.

Having learned the power of prayer, I went to God and told Him,

If I have to work, then so be it, but this is what I want: I want flexible hours, so that I can be available for my sons. I want to be able to go to daily Mass, participate in faith studies, and to work out. I want a job where I can write. And, lastly, wherever you place me, please allow me to share the beauty of the Catholic faith with women.

Fast forward one year later: I found myself still looking for a job. For one reason or another, nothing came through.

As my life was very busy with my sons’ sports schedules, it took the invitation of three different women to convince me to attend my very first Catholic Women’s Conference. Knowing that the Holy Spirit confirms in 3s, I took the third invitation as a sign. At the conference, I felt guided to simply observe.

A month after the conference, I saw in a Pilgrim Center of Hope newsletter an advertisement for a part-time job as the Catholic Women’s Conference coordinator. I met with Mary Jane Fox and, along with discussing my experience and skills, I found myself sharing with her my love for God and my faith. Though Mary Jane told me she had a few more people to interview, I was confident that the job was mine. All my ‘wants’ had been checked off. I knew God had planned this, and he was answering my prayer in his time.

Answered Hope

Now, here we are in 2018. Two months ago, I coordinated my seventh Catholic Women’s Conference.

I share this story because it is a story of answered hope, and Pilgrim Center of Hope was a big part in God’s plan to make it a reality.

In the seven years that I have worked at Pilgrim Center of Hope, I have witnessed numerous lives change through God’s gift of hope. Here are just a few . . .

  • There is the story of my niece, who was struggling in her first year of marriage. She felt overwhelmed with what everyone was telling her a wife is supposed to be. She attended a Catholic Women’s Conference and discovered who God created her to be. This experience led to a great healing in both her and her marriage.
  • There is the couple who were lukewarm in their faith and went on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. They returned on fire with love for Jesus, and have become prison ministers to bring the hope they received to others. They tell of the prisoners’ tears that flow onto the olive wood crucifix they hold in their hands as they describe how Jesus walked the Via Dolorosa and died on the Cross, for their true freedom.
  • There is the story of the man named Jose who walked in off the street during a Day of Hope held at Pilgrim Center of Hope. He said he was driving down the street and felt called to pull in. He had no idea an event was happening. He sat in the chapel in the presence of Jesus in the Eucharist. He listened to the presentation about hope, and he left. What has become of him, I do not know. But I know, like me, he was guided by the Holy Spirit to Pilgrim Center of Hope. I am grateful Pilgrim Center of Hope was here to be a place of hope for him along the way.

Living with Hope

For 25 years, Pilgrim Center of Hope has been answering Christ’s call that was first put on the hearts of Tom and Mary Jane Fox; a call to guide people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.

If you need hope, call us. If you are growing weary and beginning to despair hope even exists, call us.

If you want to know more about Pilgrim Center of Hope, consider joining us on Saturday, September 22 for our 25th Anniversary Prayer Brunch. We will present on the 25 years of hope and on “Becoming People of Hope”! We invite you to be a part of it… to become a Person of Hope.

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An ever-busy coordinator, Nan sneaks in a few minutes to observe from the back of the 2014 Catholic Women’s Conference.

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Speaking to God: Advice from Experts

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If you’ve ever tried talking to God, you’re not the only one.

In fact, in the United States, about 75 percent of adults report speaking to God/Higher Power, according to a December 2017 Pew Research Center survey.

Prayer: A Quick Refresher Course

Do you ever feel like you’re “praying wrong” or don’t know how to start praying? I can assure you from our ministry experience at Pilgrim Center of Hope (PCH)…

Don’t worry: Almost everyone feels this way!

Even Jesus’ disciples wanted to know how to pray. They asked him, “Teach us to pray.” So, Jesus outlined the most fundamental prayer for them, known today as the Lord’s Prayer or the Our Father. Each line of this prayer teaches us something important about prayer:

Our Father in heaven,
hallowed (holy) be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread;
and forgive us our debts
as we forgive our debtors;
and do not subject us to the final test,
but deliver us from the evil one.
(Matthew 6:9-13)

We could meditate on what each line of this prayer means, and still would find new insights with each day.

Maybe we need more clarification. One of the greatest treasures we have is the model of the saints, who were human beings just like us—with complicated lives, struggles, challenges, joys, and sorrows. Through practice, they became prayer experts. At Pilgrim Center of Hope, we mine their treasured insights like the spiritual gold and jewels that they are, especially through our monthly Days & Evenings of Hope, and Socials with the Saints events.

Here are some of our favorite pieces of advice:

Four Simple Attitudes

St. Anthony of Padua was known for his teaching style that would captivate the listener. Here’s what he taught about how we should pray:

  1. Open your heart confidently to God.
  2. Speak affectionately with God.
  3. Present to God your needs.
  4. Praise and thank God.

In Difficult Times

When we face challenges, prayer can become more difficult. Recently, we at PCH learned from someone who understands this well, St. Mary MacKillop. Like Jesus, Mary MacKillop experienced the rejection of her own religious leaders, through an unjust excommunication.

We were in awe during a recent Social with the Saints, as we read that Mary would often say, “Today, God has been so good to me.” Considering her tremendously difficult circumstances, what an insight this was for us, into maintaining a prayerful attitude. She advised, “Let us study the Heart of God and, in doing so, we shall learn many beautiful lessons of patience and love.”

Of prayer, she said, “Let me humbly place myself in the presence of my God, of my God who created me, my God who redeemed me, my God who sanctified me.”

When Words Fail

What about when we simply cannot express ourselves in words? St. Teresa of Avila assured us, “Prayer is an act of love; words are not needed. Even if sickness distracts from thoughts, all that is needed is the will to love.”

St. Paul further reminds us that God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit work together to communicate with us, as long as we open our hearts to God: “We do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings. And the one who searches hearts knows what is the intention of the Spirit, because it intercedes for the holy ones according to God’s will” (Romans 8:26-27).

Don’t worry; “the holy ones” in this context does not leave you out. “Holy” means “set apart,” and when we choose to pray, we are setting ourselves apart. Jesus encourages us: “For this is the will of my Father, that everyone who sees the Son and believes in him may have eternal life, and I shall raise him [on] the last day” (John 6:40).

Start Now –

Do not be afraid; simply choose to pray. Picture Jesus in your mind. Ask for guidance. You have nothing to lose! God is eager to enter this journey with you.

Take advantage of upcoming opportunities to gain more insights and to practice prayer. We invite you to browse our Events Calendar.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.

Love: Seeing His Face

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A heart that loves God and neighbor (cf. Mt 22: 36-40), genuinely and not merely in words, is a pure heart; it can see God […] Keeping a heart free of all that tarnishes love: that is holiness (no. 87).

Those are the words of Pope Francis, taken from his recent Apostolic Exhortation Guadete et Exsultate – On the Call to Holiness in Today’s World.

At a recent taping of our new radio program Journeys of Hope, our Co-Founder and Co-Director, Deacon Tom Fox, spoke eloquently and passionately about trying to imagine what it must have been like when Jesus Christ looked into the eyes of Matthew and said, Come, follow me (cf. Matthew 9: 9-13).

Matthew was a tax collector; individuals who were looked down upon and treated like prostitutes and the worst of sinners. So, we can imagine Matthew’s surprise when Jesus singled him out.

In this instant, Matthew realized, “Christ is calling me! …He knows me! … He loves me!” The words and the look of Jesus must have washed over Matthew with such warmth that he was overcome by the love, peace, and mercy of Christ.

It is this type of transformative grace that Jesus wants all of us to experience! But in order for the Look of Christ …the Gaze of God… to bear fruit, we must respond with conviction and say, Lord Jesus, be the Lord of my life.

One of my favorite passages from The Imitation of Christ is from the section, “On Loving Jesus Above All Else,” which reads in part:

The love of Jesus is faithful and enduring […] He who embraces Jesus shall stand firm forever. Love Him then, and keep Him as your friend, and when all others forsake you, He will never leave you or allow you to perish. […] Your Beloved is of such a nature that He will tolerate no rival; He will have your heart for Himself alone and reign there as King on His rightful throne. (Book Two, Chapter 7)

And then there is the Greatest Commandment handed down by Jesus:
You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your being, with all your strength, and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself (Luke 10: 27). As Christians, our priorities should be as follows: God, Family, Church, Country, and then Work.

Unless you let him warm you more and more with his love and tenderness, you will not catch fire. How will you then be able to set the hearts of others on fire by your words and witness? If, gazing on the face of Christ, you feel unable to let yourself be healed and transformed, then enter into the Lord’s heart, into his wounds, for that is the abode of divine mercy (Gaudete Et Exsultate, no. 151).

I wish everyone reading this the peace and love of Christ. May you see and experience the Gaze of God.

Lord, give me only your love and your grace. That is enough for me. – St. Ignatius of Loyola

Every month, Pilgrim Center of Hope offers opportunities to experience God’s love and grace. We invite you to pray before the Blessed Sacrament at our Gethsemane Chapel, also consider our Afternoon Tea with St. Robert Bellarmine (9-13-18) or our Day & Evening of Hope; venerate a stone from Mount Calvary (9-27-18). For times and schedules visit our website at PilgrimCenterofHope.org.

Answering Christ’s call, Pilgrim Center of Hope guides people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.

Serving the Lord

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“As for me and my household, we will serve the Lord.”

My wife, Mary Jane and I would often see these famous words from Joshua at the doors of many homes as we went door to door throughout our parish boundaries over thirty years ago. I think Joshua would once again like to rally the people of this generation and ask us who we will choose to serve. However, today the gods are not “beyond the river;” as stated in the first reading; they are in our midst. They are often within our own ideas that are no longer faithful to the Word of God. We have seen the consequences of unfaithfulness to the Word of God in the Old Testament and we can see the consequences in our own time. We know of the powerful work of God in the Old Testament, but we also know of the powerful work of Jesus Christ. We know that he spoke with great authority and worked many miracles to show that he was the Messiah, the Son of God. We also know that he died on the cross for our sins so that we might have eternal life, and he made it possible for us to experience his love and mercy right now and have a personal relationship with him. However, he also says,

“You are my friends if you do what I command you.” Jn 15:14

In the second reading we get a glimpse of what the love of God looks like. “Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ loved the Church.” This is a supernatural, sacrificial love that is only possible if we love “The Lord Our God with all our mind, heart, soul and strength.” If we make God a priority in our lives we will experience an abundance of His love and mercy, and then share His love and mercy with others so that we also might be “holy without blemish.” God can do this in us if it is the desire of our hearts.
In the Gospel we see that many of Jesus disciples found his teaching on the Eucharist too difficult to accept and would no longer follow him. When he said to the twelve;

“Do you also want to leave?” -John 6:68

Simon Peter answered him,

“Master, to whom shall we go? -John 6:68

You have the words to eternal life. We have come to believe and are convinced that you are the Holy One of God.” They did not understand the teaching of the Eucharist any more than those who left, but they remained because their faith in Jesus was stronger than their need to understand the mystery he had just taught them. We also are called to believe things we do not understand.
In baptism we received the theological gifts of Faith, Hope and Charity as well as the gifts of the Holy Spirit. These gifts that make it possible to believe the things we do not understand, however, no matter how precious these gifts are, they only benefit us according to our use of them. What we believe right now about anything, especially the mysteries of our faith, is a consequence of the choices we have made throughout our life. Have we chosen to be formed in our faith; to become mature Christians? We saw a statistic stating that less than ten percent of Catholics read Catholic books or periodicals. Our Catholic Faith is the “Pearle of Great Price”, but we must be invested in it if it is to produce good fruit in our lives.

 
In His Church, Our Lord has given is everything we need to remain close to Him and to experience an abundance of his love and mercy. The sacrament of confession is a personal encounter with Jesus Christ through his minister the priest. We not only have our sins forgiven, we receive the grace necessary to make progress in overcoming sin so that we can love God, our neighbor and ourselves with the supernatural, sacrificial love mentioned in the second reading. During Mass we hear the Word of God which is the seed of life that wants to take root in our hearts and souls so that it will bear fruit. However, we must listen with a desire to believe.

 
After we profess our creed together in a few minutes, we begin the second part of the Mass, the liturgy of the Eucharist. The Word of God and the Holy Eucharist connect us to Calvary where Jesus shed his blood for us. By the power of the Holy Spirit, the passion, death and resurrection of Christ are made present to us as we worship him along with the angels and saints. Through the prayers of the priest and the power of the Holy Spirit Jesus Christ will change bread and wine into his own body and blood so that we may receive him in Holy Communion. We for our part must prepare ourselves for this holy encounter by being properly disposed and by going to confession if we have committed any serious sin.
Serving God is not a matter of convenience. It is a matter of being faithful to what God has revealed to us through the Church and the Scriptures. It is the same journey that saints have taken through the ages; there is no easier path. There is also no other path that brings so much peace, joy and happiness. Jesus not only wants to transform our hearts and souls when we receive him during Mass; in his humility he waits for us to visit him in the Blessed Sacrament Chapel where we can rest in his presence. We know what Jesus has done for us. What are we willing to do for him? The reality is we cannot do something for him without him doing even more for us. Try spending one hour a week in the chapel for a month and learn for yourself the value of spending time with Jesus. This is one of the best ways to develop a personal relationship with Jesus.

A requirement of our faith is not only believing what has been revealed to us, but also sharing what we believe. If we do not share our faith we will be like the seed that produced no fruit. Which is the fundamental purpose of our life and the only way to true happiness.

 

 

Answering Christ’s call, we guide people to encounter him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.

When God Praises Us

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by Heinrich Hofmann

Color print from a 1930s religious pamphlet. — Image by © PoodlesRock/Corbis

Wouldn’t it be amazing to be praised by God?!

There are several passages in which Jesus praises, compliments and delights in a person. We will read about three below who though very different from one another, all share one attribute . . .

FAITH!

One instance is the story of the hemorrhaging woman who made what had to be a tortuous crawl through the dusty and rocky road in the hope of healing after 12 years of constant disappointment. Just by touching the tassel of Jesus’ cloak, He felt her faith. He felt it as power leaving Him and flowing into her; this broken, grasping, desperate soul who chose to believe He could help her.

God’s praise of her?

“Daughter your faith has healed you. Go in peace and be freed from your suffering,” (Mark 5:34).

Then there was the centurion, a man who by culture should not believe in God. Who by his status as a citizen and his rank as a soldier of Rome, should have trusted in the world’s power. But, who instead chose to believe in Jesus, asking Him to come and save his beloved servant who was paralyzed and suffering dreadfully.  Jesus offers to come, and the centurion responds,

“[…] just say the word and my servant will be healed,” (Matthew 8:8).

God’s compliment to him?

“Amen, I say to you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith,” (Matthew 8:10).  “’You may go, as you have believed, let it be done for you.’ And at that very hour his servant was healed.” (Matthew 8:13).

Third, there is the Canaanite woman, who for the love of her daughter and even after a seeming insult says to Jesus,

“Lord, help me […] “Please, Lord, for even the dogs eat the scraps that fall from the table of their masters,” (Matthew 15: 25,27).

God’s delight in her?

 “O woman, great is your faith!  Let it be done for you as you wish,” (Matthew 15:28).

The Apostle, Paul, defines faith in Hebrews 11:1 as,

“[…] the realization of what is hoped for and evidence of things not seen,”

But I confess, that definition has never been clear to me.

I have always needed simpler explanations, so whenever I am in prayer and a word strikes me, I like to look it up in the dictionary on my mobile phone. Our Lord has yet to disappoint, drawing me to the exact definition He wants me to see.

So how is faith defined on my phone?  Faith is confidence or trust in a person.

What the hemorrhaging woman, the centurion and the Canaanite woman all possess is confidence in Jesus.  They put their trust in the hope that this Man is who He says He is and will do what He says He will do.  Which I now understand, is exactly how St. Paul defines faith.

How can we have a faith worthy of God’s praise?

By doing exactly what these three did . . .  we go to Jesus and we choose to believe that He is who He says He is and will do what He says He will do. In the Gospel of John 6:47-51, He most emphatically states,

“Amen, amen, I say to you, whoever believes has eternal life. I am the bread of life. Your ancestors ate the manna in the desert, but they died; this is the bread that comes down from heaven so that one may eat it and not die. I am the living bread that came down from heaven; whoever eats this bread will live forever; and the bread that I will give is my flesh for the life of the world.”

We are blessed to be able daily to come to Jesus where He is Really and Truly Present: in His Sacraments and in the Eucharist. We can do so by receiving Him in Communion at Mass, by receiving the Sacrament of Reconciliation often and by presenting ourselves to Him in Adoration of the Eucharist. To know more about the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, go to: The United States Conference of Bishops answers basic questions about the Real Presence.

If you need hope in finding Jesus, contact us at Pilgrim Center of Hope.  Answering Christ’s call, we guide people to encounter Him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.  Let us journey with you.

You’re invited to Day’s and Evening’s of Hope! The relic of St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church,  will be available for veneration at Pilgrim Center of Hope’s Gethsemane Chapel!

Join us on Wednesday, August 22nd,  from 12:30 – 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 – 8:30 p.m.

 

Answering Christ’s call, we guide people to encounter him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.

 

How does Christian Faith Help Me?

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This is a big question!  We must begin by defining the Christian faith.  Faith is trust, assurance and confidence in the one true God; Creator of the Universe.

As Christians we believe in one God, Creator of Heaven and Earth, whom we also call our Heavenly Father.  We believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, who was sent by Father to show us His love. Christ Jesus died for us, resurrected and ascended to Heaven.  We believe in the Holy Spirit called the Counselor, our helper to guide us and lead us in our daily lives.

Who can testify to this Truth?

 

I can!  I was baptized when only a few months old, my parents and family instilled in me the Catholic Christian Faith as I grew up.  Witnessing their faith in God and faithfulness to the teachings given to us through the Scriptures and the Catholic Church.  I remember seeing them pray, attend Mass every Sunday and were involved in church activities from bingo to prayer services.  All this became apart of my life as well.  When the family experienced trials, my parents would light a candle before an image of Christ and His blessed Mother Mary and pray diligently for guidance.

All these things instilled in me the importance of having faith in God who is above all, knows all and grants us the necessary help needed.  I also witnessed and experienced the peace it brought.

Christianity is about a person, Jesus Christ.  It’s about a way of life; choosing to follow Christ and His teachings.  It is our choice; and when we make that first step, whether it be crying out to God from the depth of our heart, or by seeking Him in a community of believers; we can begin to see a difference in our own lives.

Our lives are really short compared to Eternity!

 

Whether we live to be 40, 70, 90, or over 100; faith can lead us to keep our eyes and hearts focused on God; who will always be there for us. The Catechism of the Catholic Church states:

“Our profession of faith begins with God, for God is the First and the Last, the beginning and the end of everything. The Credo begins with God the Father, for the Father is the first divine person of the Most Holy Trinity; our Creed begins with the creation of heaven and earth, for creation is the beginning and the foundation of all God’s works.”  (CCC#1980)

“Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.”  Hebrews 11:1

Begin anew today! Speak to God from your heart;

He is waiting for you!

 

 

You’re invited to Day’s and Evening’s of Hope! The relic of St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church,  will be available for veneration at Pilgrim Center of Hope’s Gethsemane Chapel!

Join us on Wednesday, August 22nd,  from 12:30 – 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 – 8:30 p.m.

 

Answering Christ’s call, we guide people to encounter him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.

 

 

 

Keep the Faith

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As you read this, the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame are in the last couple of weeks of preparing for their first game against Michigan on September 1. I am a diehard fan. I attended ND, and my older brother is a graduate. Over the years, I have always ‘kept the faith,’ through the great and not-so-great seasons. As the motto goes, God, Country, and Notre Dame!

Keeping the Faith is all about continuing to believe in someone or something especially when it is difficult to do so.

Faith is our spiritual theme for August. We begin this month by celebrating the Transfiguration of Our Lord. We will conclude the month by marking the feast days of St. Augustine (8-28) and St. Monica (8-27). Not only do the Transfiguration, St. Augustine, and St. Monica provide us with examples of what ‘keeping the faith’ is all about, but they also should encourage our belief in God.

The Transfiguration of Our Lord – August 6

While he was praying his face changed in appearance and his clothing became dazzling white…This is my chosen Son; listen to him(cf. Luke 9: 28, 35).

It was in this moment that the spiritual glory of Jesus became visible to Peter, James, and John. In Latin, trans means across and figura means form or shape. His appearance changed and became glorious!

The Catechism of the Catholic Church reveals to us how this inspired the three Apostles to keep the faith: Christ’s Transfiguration aims at strengthening the apostle’s faith in anticipation of his Passion: the ascent onto the ‘high mountain’ (Mt. Tabor) prepares for the ascent to Calvary (CCC 568).

Aside from preparing the three for what was to come, the Transfiguration also connected them to God…that was God’s voice in the cloud. Sometimes God gives us similar special experiences of his grace to strengthen our faith. These moments are intended to sustain us when we face the challenges of life.

Lessons from Another Mother and Son

On the one hand St. Monica is the epitome of not only keeping the faith, but never losing it. Despite the licentious and adventuresome youth of St. Augustine, his mother St. Monica never wavered in her constant and persistent prayer for him. The example of St. Monica should offer each of us hope, encouragement, and inspiration, when it comes to maintaining our faith and trust in God, when faced with what appear to be hopeless causes.

On his road to conversion, St. Augustine asked all the big questions, like who is God, and who am I? Throughout his early life Augustine struggled with family, friends, meaning, and purpose. Sound familiar? What he discovered is that the Christian life is a journey that we walk by faith.

St. Augustine once said, our whole business therefore in this life is to restore to health the eye of the heart whereby God may be seen.

Because of St. Monica’s prayers, God moved in St. Augustine’s life. God is moving – always – in our own journeys as well. Sometimes we don’t realize it, but we are all on the journey to God – one in mind and heart.

Go Irish!

Since the beginning of the 20thCentury, the faith in Notre Dame – the University and the football team – has been so strong that it has created a mystique that is palpable. I’ll never forget the first time I stepped onto the campus at age 12…it was as if the air was charged with electricity.

Faith and belief in God can be quite powerful, we just need to let it flow!

 

You’re invited to Day’s and Evening’s of Hope! The relic of St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church,  will be available for veneration at Pilgrim Center of Hope’s Gethsemane Chapel!

Join us on Wednesday, August 22nd,  from 12:30 – 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 – 8:30 p.m.

 

Answering Christ’s call, we guide people to encounter him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. 

 

Coming Together as A Faith Community

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In the Gospel of John, the Evangelist often refers to the miracles that Jesus performs as signs because they point to something more significant and some of the signs or important events happen near the time of Passover. The Passover was and is the Jewish celebration of their deliverance form their captivity in Egypt. After the Angel of death passed over the homes of the Israelites that were marked with the blood of a lamb, he struck down the first born of Pharaoh and all the Egyptians. After this event, Pharaoh allowed the Israelites to leave Egypt.

Jesus is not only the fulfillment of the Law and the Prophets, he is also the fulfillment of the Passover, because he is the Lamb of God who shed his blood to save us from eternal death. That’s why the Feast of the Passover is so significant in the ministry of Jesus.

Jesus’ first miracle took place at the wedding feast of Cana. We remember how he changed the water in six stone jars, each holding twenty to thirty gallons, into wine. A Scripture commentary states,

“The vast quantity recalls the prophecies of abundance in the last days.”

This miracle or sign not only fulfills prophecy, it is Eucharistic because it points toward the wine that will be changed into the blood of Christ

“…which will be poured out for you and for many for the forgiveness of sins”

After this first miracle of Jesus, the Scripture says that he and his mother and disciples went down to Capernaum for only a few days. The next sentence says,

“Since the Passover of the Jews was near, Jesus went up to Jerusalem.”

Today’s Gospel also mentions that the Jewish feast of Passover is near and the miracle, or sign that Jesus will perform, the multiplication of the loaves and fishes is also Eucharistic because it points to the bread that will be changed into the Body of Christ which will feed the multitudes until the end of time. An interesting point in this Gospel is that Jesus asks Philip,

“Where can we buy enough food for them to eat,”

even though he already knew what he was going to do. There is a message here for us. When we are confronted with challenges and trials and we ask the Lord for help, he may ask us what contribution we will make to resolve the difficulty. Perhaps it is our prayer and fasting or it may be the use of the gifts that we have received from the Holy Spirit in baptism. We all have something that the Lord can use and he wants us to be involved in the resolution.

Another interesting point;

“Now there was a great deal of grass in that place.”

This abundance of grass means it was spring time, which again is the time of Passover. About three weeks ago our pilgrim group visited the Mt. of Beatitudes where we could over look the beautiful Sea of Galilee and this very spot where Jesus performed this miracle. As you look down from the mount toward the Sea you will find an area that is almost shaped like an amphitheater which could easily accommodate thousands of people. This is where Jesus multiplied five loaves and two fish in order to feed thousands of his followers. This was a real miracle that showed Jesus power of matter and it happened in a real place that you can visit today.

This miracle of the multiplication is a prelude to Jesus discourse on the Eucharist, the Bread of Life, which he proclaims to the crowds that seek him out the next day. He admonishes them because they were interested primarily in the food he had provided. He then explains to them at great length that he is the Bread of Life which they must eat if they are to have eternal life. Four times he tells them they must eat his flesh and drink his blood if they are to live forever. Many of his followers found this teaching to difficult to accept and would no longer follow him.

The final Passover that Jesus celebrates is what we call the Last Supper. This event ties together the miracle of the wine and the miracle of the loaves. At the Last Supper Jesus not only teaches his Apostles that they must be servants of one another by washing their feet; he also institutes the priesthood and the sacrament of the Holy Eucharist.

The Apostles who faithfully stayed with Jesus because they believed in him will finally understand how Jesus will give them his blood to drink and his flesh to eat. They become his first priests and Jesus will change bread and wine into his own body and blood through their hands and the hands of all the priests who will follow them.

The Holy Eucharist is a mystery of God’s love for us. At this Eucharist which we celebrate today and at every Eucharist celebrated everyday, every where in the world, Jesus Christ makes present to us his passion, death and resurrection. When we come to worship our Triune God we transcend time as we join the angels and saints offering praise and glory to Almighty God. We also have the opportunity to receive the body and blood of Jesus Christ if we are properly prepared and disposed.

This is not an empty ritual as some may think. Jesus loves us so much that he gives us himself under the appearance of bread and wine, but not all who receive Holy Communion receive the same benefit. It depends on how we have prepared.

Have we fasted for one hour from everything except water and medicine?

The purpose of this small fast is to remind us that we are about to enter into a supernatural experience.

How long has it been since we have gone to confession?

We cannot receive the Lord in Communion if we have serious sin on our soul. Sin is an obstacle to the grace that Jesus wants us to receive.

Are we dressed as if we were going to have a personal encounter with Jesus Christ?

Sunday Mass should be the high point of our week because we come together as a faith community to bear witness to our love for God and one another and His love for us. Jesus wants us to receive a super abundance of his grace, but he also wants us to be prepared to enter into intimacy with him so that we can be transformed by his love and then truly live our faith and share it with others.

This blog was Deacon Tom’s homily for the 17th Sunday (B) in Ordinary Time

You’re invited to Day’s and Evening’s of Hope! The relic of St. Benedict of Nusia will be available for veneration at Pilgrim Center of Hope’s Gethsemane Chapel!

Join us on Tuesday, July 31st from 6:00 -8:30 p.m.

 

Answering Christ’s call, we guide people to encounter him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. 

 

Silence Can Lead to Peace

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We live in the most talkative age in the history of the world.  It would take millions of men and women in previous ages to communicate to others the same information which one person today provides in a single broadcast.

Do you think that the love of noise and excitement in modern civilization is due in part to the fact that people are unhappy on the inside?  Noise exteriorizes us, distracts us and can sometimes make us forget worries for the moment.  Let’s face it… noise; whether it’d be electronic, people, or even music; it can fill us, but not fulfill us.

Almost everyone desires some sense of peace, but we usually look in the wrong places.  Jesus said:

“Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you.  I do not give to you as the world gives.  Do not let your hearts be troubled.”  (John 14:27)

Silence is a beginning. Mother Teresa explains it well:

 “We need to find God, and he cannot be found in noise and restlessness. God is the friend of silence. … If your heart is full of worldly things, you cannot hear the voice of God.  But when you have listened to his voice in the silence of your heart, then your heart is filled.”

How does one find God in silence?  By opening the door of your heart.  A Key that can help open that door:  Our free will to choose to begin!

Okay – so we want to start!

Begin 3-5 minutes daily by simply being, not doing anything or reading. Don’t give up if you are distracted.  Ask God for His help, the grace of silence. Thank God for silence.
Silence in daily life is possible!

  • eliminate radio time while driving, cooking, washing dishes.
  • wake up in the morning in silence,  (without TV news, or  music)

 

Do not be afraid to be in silence.  The fruit of silence can be a deeper desire to pray, to ponder, to think before making choices or decisions.  Silence can lead us to peace in our hearts.   Remember, Mother Teresa’s words:  God is a friend of silence.

The Pilgrim Center of Hope has a Chapel Gethsemane with Jesus in His Eucharistic Presence.  Come and spend time in silence in our Chapel open Monday through Friday; 8:30am – 5:30pm.  We, at the Pilgrim Center of Hope, offer Morning and Evening Reflections for prayer groups, parish churches, organizations.

You’re invited to Day’s and Evening’s of Hope! The relic of St. Benedict of Nusia will be available for veneration at Pilgrim Center of Hope’s Gethsemane Chapel!

Join us on Tuesday, July 31st from 6:00 -8:30 p.m.

Answering Christ’s call, we guide people to encounter him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life. 

Can I Get a Witness?

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In 2 Peter 1:3-8, we read,

His divine power has bestowed on us everything that makes for life and devotion, through the knowledge of him who called us by his own glory and power. Through these, he has bestowed on us the precious and very great promises, so that through them you may come to share in the divine nature, after escaping from the corruption that is in the world because of evil desire. For this very reason, make every effort to supplement your faith with virtue, virtue with knowledge, knowledge with self-control, self-control with endurance, endurance with devotion, devotion with mutual affection, mutual affection with love. If these are yours and increase in abundance, they will keep you from being idle or unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.

The author of this letter is teaching us. He explains the spiritual steps we can learn to ensure we remain on the path that leads us closer to God daily:

  • Faith, to..
  • Virtue, to..
  • Knowledge, to..
  • Self Control, to..
  • Endurance, to..
  • Devotion, to..
  • Mutual affection to love

What makes this lesson especially worth listening to, is that the author is also a witness.

In Evangelii Nuntiandi (Evangelization in the Modern World), Pope Paul VI, writes,

“Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.”

Long before he became Saint Peter, he was Simon; a son of a man named Jonah, a husband and fisherman. Thanks to an encounter with Jesus Christ, Simon began a journey of faith in being Peter; an Apostle, the rock on which Jesus would build his Church and the first Pope.

It was not an easy road for him, and it never ceased to be a journey. In his book, The Priest is Not His Own, Archbishop Fulton Sheen writes,

“Peter never entirely got rid of Simon. But once called, Simon never ceased to be Peter.”

Even at his martyrdom, he felt unworthy; insisting on being crucified upside down, as he did not merit the death of his Lord.

Saint Peter is a perfect example of a missionary of hope; one who continues to grow humbly in faith as he boldly proclaims Christ’s Gospel message.

We can imagine this letter being penned after years of traveling those spiritual steps; often going forth and back as he gauged his progress and discerned where he may have veered off road. His witness gives us confidence in the merit of learning from teachings of Scripture and by daily walking what we have been taught.

Jesus did not wait for Simon Peter to be perfect, nor does he wait for us.

You’re invited to Day’s and Evening’s of Hope! The relic of St. Benedict of Nusia will be available for veneration at Pilgrim Center of Hope’s Gethsemane Chapel!

Join us on Tuesday, July 31st from 6:00 -8:30 p.m.

We at Pilgrim Center of Hope embrace this message of hope! We are a small staff, hundreds of volunteers, benefactors, and prayer intercessors; living as missionaries of hope!  We invite you to join us. Come and see! Visit Pilgrim Center of Hope in-person or online.

 

Answering Christ’s call, we guide people to encounter him so as to live in hope, as pilgrims in daily life.