From “Do not touch me,” to Wounded Healer

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Easter Sunday was a little over two weeks ago, but we’re still in the Easter Season. This means you can eat as much candy as humanly, even professionally possible until Pentecost. It also means we still get to savor the triumph of Christ’s Easter resurrection in a liturgically focused way.

The Reaction

That said, there’s one small detail about the Easter narrative that always holds my curiosity until well after the celebrations have ceased. When Mary Magdalene, the first witness of Christ’s resurrection, turned startled toward him outside the tomb, she was understandably overjoyed. She must have thrown her arms around him, because Jesus surprisingly told her, “Do not touch me, for I have not yet ascended to my Father.”

Do not touch me? From Jesus? Just a few days ago, Mary Magdalene was anointing his head with oil. Christ even rebuked Judas, who objected that the oil should have been sold and the money given to the poor. Why, in the midst of Mary’s exuberance, would Jesus rebuff her touch?

It Takes Time

Jesus offers the explanation, “I have not yet ascended to my Father,” but I wonder if that was only because he thought his wounds would be less sensitive in Heaven. Perhaps his wounds–though glorified in his resurrected body–were still too tender to be touched. In fact, after some time passes, Jesus invites Thomas to place his hand inside his open wounds.

Jesus is fully human as well as fully divine, and it’s human nature to need some time after suffering a trauma for the pain to become less raw. Like Jesus, Christians are called to become wounded healers–people whose wounds become glorified pathways of healing for others. But not right away! Not right after the wound is inflicted. Like Christ, we often need time to process the pain, to manage its lingering effects, to gradually have our experiences take on a deeper meaning that we can then share with others.

If you are suffering from a past or ongoing trauma, consider seeing a Catholic therapist that can help you heal from the damage and turn your wounds over to the Divine Physician. God desires our healing, our joy and our wholeness in Him. CatholicTherapists.com has a useful search engine that can find a professional Catholic counselor near you. To learn more about various topics in relation to Catholicism, visit CatholicismLive.com.

 

 

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About Greg Camacho

Greg Camacho is the Media Assistant at the Pilgrim Center of Hope, including projects related to social media and Catholicism Live!. The Pilgrim Log is the blog of the Pilgrim Center of Hope, a Catholic evangelization ministry, providing weekly spiritual reflections to help you journey toward a deeper relationship with Christ. Learn more about the Pilgrim Center of Hope by visiting www.pilgrimcenterofhope.org.

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