Tag Archives: Father

Lent Is for Healing

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B Lent is for Healing

Do you ever dread Lent? Do you see it as a burden?

A few years ago, as I was dreading the upcoming Lenten Season —with its sacrifices and spotlight on sin, I began to notice in my prayer life and while reading Scripture that a theme continually jumped out at me. Example from the Psalms:

Look to God that you may be radiant with joy
and your faces may not blush with shame
Psalm 34

Bless the Lord, my soul
and do not forget all his gifts,
Who pardons all your sins,
and heals all your ills,
Who redeems your life from the pit,
and crowns you with mercy and compassion
Psalm 103

and the Prophet Isaiah (53:3)

He bore the punishment that makes us whole, by his wounds we were healed.

Whole? Healed? Joy? Verses like this were a shock to my system. I had been wrestling with a perception of God as a harsh judge who was ready to pounce and condemn. Through prayer, however, the Holy Spirit was showing me that my perception of God was broken, and therefore my understanding of my relationship to God was broken. As Lent approached, I realized that I needed to obey the Holy Spirit. With some encouragement, I began to see a counselor and break free of many hurts and wounds.

This process of being vulnerable with myself, with God, and with my counselor was the most humiliating experience of my life. It was heart-wrenching and psychologically painful. However, I realized that this pain was necessary for healing.

Your Lent and Healing

Think about how often we must experience challenge or pain in order to be healed. Whether through surgery, exercise, or even the humiliation of apologizing to someone, healing and wellness arrive through sacrifice.

Lent is a time of preparation, leading us into the remembrance of Jesus Christ’s suffering, death, and resurrection. We often hear that Jesus underwent these things for our “salvation” and “to save us”, but what does that mean?

The word ‘salvation’ comes from the Latin salvus, which means ‘in good health’ and ‘safe’.  The official teaching of the Catholic Church in its Catechism is that Jesus “has come to heal the whole man, soul and body” (pp. 1503). This means that Jesus came, not only to keep us from going to hell, but far more than that. We often keep Jesus and his place in our life within that very limited box! No, Jesus himself tells us, “I came so that they might have life and have it more abundantly” (John 10:10).

How to Start

Do not limit your Lent to “giving something up”. Start now; live your Lent as a time of healing. Approach God as Jesus taught us: as your loving Father. Ask, “What is your loving plan for me? What is blocking me from having a stronger relationship with you?” Listen to God’s response, not only in your private prayer, but in the other avenues God has given us. Read from the Catechism of the Catholic Church or the lives of the saints. Speak to someone of faith whom you respect; a grandmother, a person who works in your parish, friend, etc. Homilies on Sundays or weekday Mass can also be a source of direction. What strikes you on a deeply personal level?

Trust that God is a good and loving Father, Jesus wants to heal you, and the Holy Spirit wants to console you. This Lent, embrace a challenge that will help you overcome obstacles to the abundant life and intimate relationship with God that He has in store for you.

Is God calling you to go on a journey of faith? Pilgrimages provide an opportunity for people to seek God, healing, spiritual renewal, reparation, forgiveness, and other personal graces—ultimately becoming a mini school of spirituality. Our Ministry of Pilgrimages is here for you; guiding you to a personal encounter with Christ.

I found God in the World Series

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baseballHave you ever wept, and not understood why?

It was late at night in San Antonio, but my husband had the TV on the World Series. We never watch TV.

“Is that the last game?” I asked. As I sat next to him, I realized how unplugged I’d been from this Great American Past-Time.

“Yep,” he replied.

I found myself wrapped up in the seventh inning. Then, the eighth…ninth…rain delay…!? My husband and I bantered back and forth as we watched. “I can’t explain why this game is so fascinating to me!” I declared. Then, bottom of the tenth: blue uniforms rushed together and jubilantly bounced around the screen.

“CUBS WIN!” exclaimed the announcer. My husband continued relaying his childhood World Series memories. But a lump formed in my throat. Silently, I began to weep.

As Dan glanced over at me, he noticed my face, wrinkled with emotion. “Oh—I didn’t know,” he said quietly, surprised, “that you’re a Cubs fan.”

“My great-grandmother was from Chicago,” I whispered through sniffles. “She was seven years old when the Cubs last won the World Series. Every time we’d go visit her and the Cubs were playing, she’d have them on TV.”

But I wasn’t crying because I missed her. No—I wasn’t even crying because I was witnessing something she’d longed to see.

A Mysterious Union

As I watched Mimi’s Cubbies win the World Series, in an instant, I became overwhelmingly aware of God. Here it was, All Souls Day—the day when the Church remembers its departed members—and in an instant, I had an intense experience of nearness.

This nearness had nothing to do with spatial relationship and everything to do with intimacy. This nearness was so intense, so filled with God. I don’t know how else to describe it. Neither my body nor my intellect could contain or comprehend this nearness; I just wept.

These were not tears of sadness, nor tears of joy. They were tears in response to an incomprehensible experience of communion.

“We believe in the communion of all the faithful of Christ, those who are pilgrims on earth, the dead who are being purified, and the blessed in heaven, all together forming one Church; and we believe that in this communion, the merciful love of God and his saints is always [attentive] to our prayers” (Pope Paul VI, Catechism of the Catholic Church, pp. 962).

b-baseballThis experience of God in my living room, watching the World Series, is just a peek into the awesomeness of our God. Our God is not only united unto himself as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; but also mysteriously united with us. “In him, we live and move and have our being.” (Acts 17:28) Have you spent a minute lately, realizing how near God is to you?

“There is no place or thing in this world where he is not truly present. […] Although faith assures us of his presence, yet because we do not see him with our eyes we often forget about him and behave as if God were far distant from us. We really know that he is present in all things, but because we do not reflect on that fact we act as if we did not know it.” – St. Francis de Sales, Introduction to the Devout Life

Be still, and know that I am God.” – Psalm 46:10

We have an opportunity for men to encounter Christ with their fellow brothers in Christ coming up soon.”Master, I want to see” is the scripture that was chosen for our annual Catholic Men’s Conference. We hope to see you at CMC 2017 . Get all the details at CMCSanAntonio.com.